Briquetting plant

Briqueting Plant

Many customers only think that they need a briquetting press, when considering the investment in a briquetting line. Depending on the raw material – size and moisture – more equipment is needed. The examples below show some of the different briquetting lines where you can see which equipment is needed.

Scoll down and find the briquetting line that fits your needs or use the headlines a go straight to a specific briquetting line.

Consumer logs wood

DRY RAW MATERIAL

Raw material

Raw materials are mainly wood. It is important that you define your raw material. It can be wood logs, wood chips, sawdust, shavings, demolition wood etc. It is important to know the moisture and size. Raw materials like wood logs and sawdust have moistures of 40-50%, demolition wood 20-25%, wood shavings 15%.

Dust extraction ventilation

After drying the raw material is sucked through a piping system through a cyclone and a filter to extract the dust and separate the air. The raw material is passed through an air-lock to a conveyor that leads it to a silo system or similar. The dust from the filter is most often lead back into the raw material.

Silo

Prior to briquetting the raw material it is lead into a silo. It is important for the efficiency of the briquetting press that the silo is full enough to give a constant feed to the briquetting press. A normal dosing silo is 4 to 8 m3, but larger silos > 50 m3 will improve efficiency of the system, as the briquetting press will be able to operate even though other parts of the line are temporary down.

Briquetting

The briquetting press is the heart of the operation. The press needs a constant feed. The presses have many features, which can be studied elsewhere on this size. The briquettes will exit in a cooling line, which will cool and harden the briquettes. For industrial fuel the cooling line needs to be approx. 15 m long and for consumer briquettes/logs approx. 30m.

Sawing

Consumer briquettes/logs need to be cut in length, normally 300 mm. This can either be done by a saw or a breaker. Which equipment to choose will depend on market conditions.

Packing

After the consumer briquettes/logs are cut they need to be packed. This is normally done in shrink film or boxes. Most normal package size is 10 kg, with typically 5-8 briquettes in each package. Packaging can be automatic or semi-automatic.

Palletizing

After packaging, the consumer briquettes/logs are palletized typically on pallets weighing approx.1 ton with approx.100 packages. Palletizing can be automatic or semi-automatic. When shipping consumer briquettes/logs a container can hold 22 pallets.

Consumer briquettes

Consumer briquettes/logs are mostly 300 mm long and are convenient compared to firewood:

  • They are dry with constant moisture
  • They are packed in foil, they take up less space
  • They give less smoke and they are environmentally friendly, as they are mostly made of wood waste.
  • The consumer briquettes/logs are used in fire places or wood burning stoves.
Consumer logs wood

WET RAW MATERIAL

Raw material

Raw materials are mainly wood. It is important that you define your raw material. It can be wood logs, wood chips, sawdust, shavings, demolition wood etc. It is important to know the moisture and size. Raw materials like wood logs and sawdust have moistures of 40-50%, demolition wood 20-25%, wood shavings 15%.

Chipping milling

Wood logs and off-cuts first need to be chipped to a smaller size. After this they need to pass another process, where they are milled down to approx.15-20x3x2 mm prior to drying. Saw dust and shavings do not need to be chipped or milled.

Drying

When the raw material has the right size it will – if it contains a moisture level above 15% – need to be dried down approx. 10%. The most used dryers are drum dryers or belt dryers.

Dust extraction ventilation

After drying the raw material is sucked through a piping system through a cyclone and a filter to extract the dust and separate the air. The raw material is passed through an air-lock to a conveyor that leads it to a silo system or similar. The dust from the filter is most often lead back into the raw material.

Silo

Prior to briquetting the raw material it is lead into a silo. It is important for the efficiency of the briquetting press that the silo is full enough to give a constant feed to the briquetting press. A normal dosing silo is 4 to 8 m3, but larger silos > 50 m3 will improve efficiency of the system, as the briquetting press will be able to operate even though other parts of the line are temporary down.

Briquetting

The briquetting press is the heart of the operation. The press needs a constant feed. The presses have many features, which can be studied elsewhere on this size. The briquettes will exit in a cooling line, which will cool and harden the briquettes. For industrial fuel the cooling line needs to be approx. 15 m long and for consumer briquettes/logs approx. 30m.

Sawing

Consumer briquettes/logs need to be cut in length, normally 300 mm. This can either be done by a saw or a breaker. Which equipment to choose will depend on market conditions.

Packing

After the consumer briquettes/logs are cut they need to be packed. This is normally done in shrink film or boxes. Most normal package size is 10 kg, with typically 5-8 briquettes in each package. Packaging can be automatic or semi-automatic.

Palletizing

After packaging, the consumer briquettes/logs are palletized typically on pallets weighing approx.1 ton with approx.100 packages. Palletizing can be automatic or semi-automatic. When shipping consumer briquettes/logs a container can hold 22 pallets.

Consumer briquettes

Consumer briquettes/logs are mostly 300 mm long and are convenient compared to firewood:

  • They are dry with constant moisture
  • They are packed in foil, they take up less space
  • They give less smoke and they are environmentally friendly, as they are mostly made of wood waste.
  • The consumer briquettes/logs are used in fire places or wood burning stoves.
Industrial briquettes wood

DRY RAW MATERIAL

Raw material

Raw materials are mainly wood. It is important that you define your raw material. It can be wood logs, wood chips, sawdust, shavings, demolition wood etc. It is important to know the moisture and size. Raw materials like wood logs and sawdust have moistures of 40-50%, demolition wood 20-25%, wood shavings 15%.

Dust extraction ventilation

After drying the raw material is sucked through a piping system through a cyclone and a filter to extract the dust and separate the air. The raw material is passed through an air-lock to a conveyor that leads it to a silo system or similar. The dust from the filter is most often lead back into the raw material.

Silo

Prior to briquetting the raw material it is lead into a silo. It is important for the efficiency of the briquetting press that the silo is full enough to give a constant feed to the briquetting press. A normal dosing silo is 4 to 8 m3, but larger silos > 50 m3 will improve efficiency of the system, as the briquetting press will be able to operate even though other parts of the line are temporary down.

Briquetting

The briquetting press is the heart of the operation. The press needs a constant feed. The presses have many features, which can be studied elsewhere on this size. The briquettes will exit in a cooling line, which will cool and harden the briquettes. For industrial fuel the cooling line needs to be approx. 15 m long and for consumer briquettes/logs approx. 30m.

Industrial briquettes

Industrial briquettes can be made in different diameters ranging from 50 mm to 120 mm. Most used type is 75 mm. Briquettes can be made as pucks (length 15-20 mm) or industrial briquettes (length 50-75 mm). Industrial briquettes are used in industrial boilers for heat, steam or electricity production.

Industrial briquettes wood

WET RAW MATERIAL

Raw material

Raw materials are mainly wood. It is important that you define your raw material. It can be wood logs, wood chips, sawdust, shavings, demolition wood etc. It is important to know the moisture and size. Raw materials like wood logs and sawdust have moistures of 40-50%, demolition wood 20-25%, wood shavings 15%.

Chipping milling

Wood logs and off-cuts first need to be chipped to a smaller size. After this they need to pass another process, where they are milled down to approx.15-20x3x2 mm prior to drying. Saw dust and shavings do not need to be chipped or milled.

Drying

When the raw material has the right size it will – if it contains a moisture level above 15% – need to be dried down approx. 10%. The most used dryers are drum dryers or belt dryers.

Dust extraction ventilation

After drying the raw material is sucked through a piping system through a cyclone and a filter to extract the dust and separate the air. The raw material is passed through an air-lock to a conveyor that leads it to a silo system or similar. The dust from the filter is most often lead back into the raw material.

Silo

Prior to briquetting the raw material it is lead into a silo. It is important for the efficiency of the briquetting press that the silo is full enough to give a constant feed to the briquetting press. A normal dosing silo is 4 to 8 m3, but larger silos > 50 m3 will improve efficiency of the system, as the briquetting press will be able to operate even though other parts of the line are temporary down.

Briquetting

The briquetting press is the heart of the operation. The press needs a constant feed. The presses have many features, which can be studied elsewhere on this size. The briquettes will exit in a cooling line, which will cool and harden the briquettes. For industrial fuel the cooling line needs to be approx. 15 m long and for consumer briquettes/logs approx. 30m.

Industrial briquettes

Industrial briquettes can be made in different diameters ranging from 50 mm to 120 mm. Most used type is 75 mm. Briquettes can be made as pucks (length 15-20 mm) or industrial briquettes (length 50-75 mm). Industrial briquettes are used in industrial boilers for heat, steam or electricity production.

Industrial briquettes agri

DRY RAW MATERIAL

Agri raw material

Agri raw material are most often baled in the field and then stored in barns or outside covered or not covered. Raw materials like wheat straw, corn stalks, cotton stalks are normally dry (below 15% moisture) or can be dried in the field. Other raw material will need to be dried prior to briquetting.

Shredder

Baled or loose raw material needs to be shredded first down to 80-100 mm length. The bales are placed on a conveyor, which moves the bales forward. Strings have to be removed prior to shredding. After shredding the raw material will go through a hammer mill to be downsized to 15-20 mm length.

Filtering

After the hammer mill, the raw material is sucked through a piping system through a cyclone and a filter to extract the dust and separate the air. The raw material is passed through an air-lock to a conveyor that leads it to a silo system or similar. The dust from the filter is most often lead back into the raw material, but for bedding the dust is separated.

Dust extraction ventilation

After drying the raw material is sucked through a piping system through a cyclone and a filter to extract the dust and separate the air. The raw material is passed through an air-lock to a conveyor that leads it to a silo system or similar. The dust from the filter is most often lead back into the raw material.

Silo

Prior to briquetting the raw material it is lead into a silo. It is important for the efficiency of the briquetting press that the silo is full enough to give a constant feed to the briquetting press. A normal dosing silo is 4 to 8 m3, but larger silos > 50 m3 will improve efficiency of the system, as the briquetting press will be able to operate even though other parts of the line are temporary down.

Briquetting

The briquetting press is the heart of the operation. The press needs a constant feed. The presses have many features, which can be studied elsewhere on this size. The briquettes will exit in a cooling line, which will cool and harden the briquettes. For industrial fuel the cooling line needs to be approx. 15 m long and for consumer briquettes/logs approx. 30m.

Agri briquettes

Agri briquettes can be made in different diameters ranging from 50 mm to 120 mm. Most used type is 90 mm. Briquettes can be made as pucks (length 15-20 mm) or industrial briquettes (length 50-75 mm). Agri briquettes are used mostly for fuel in industrial boilers for heat, steam or electricity production, however, there they are also used for special applications as bedding and for biogas.

Industrial briquettes Rice husks

DRY RAW MATERIAL

Raw material growing

The alternative to use baled raw material is to use the raw material directly from the field. This requires the raw material to be dry (below 15% moisture). The advantage is that costs and investments can be saved, but the disadvantage is that the raw material has a low density and is expensive to transport and store. Typical raw material can be miscanthus, switch grass and other similar crops.

Silo

Prior to briquetting the raw material it is lead into a silo. It is important for the efficiency of the briquetting press that the silo is full enough to give a constant feed to the briquetting press. A normal dosing silo is 4 to 8 m3, but larger silos > 50 m3 will improve efficiency of the system, as the briquetting press will be able to operate even though other parts of the line are temporary down.

Briquetting

The briquetting press is the heart of the operation. The press needs a constant feed. The presses have many features, which can be studied elsewhere on this size. The briquettes will exit in a cooling line, which will cool and harden the briquettes. For industrial fuel the cooling line needs to be approx. 15 m long and for consumer briquettes/logs approx. 30m.

Agri briquettes

Agri briquettes can be made in different diameters ranging from 50 mm to 120 mm. Most used type is 90 mm. Briquettes can be made as pucks (length 15-20 mm) or industrial briquettes (length 50-75 mm). Agri briquettes are used mostly for fuel in industrial boilers for heat, steam or electricity production, however, there they are also used for special applications as bedding and for biogas.

Industrial briquettes Wheat straw, corn stalks, cotton stalks

DRY RAW MATERIAL

Raw material growing

The alternative to use baled raw material is to use the raw material directly from the field. This requires the raw material to be dry (below 15% moisture). The advantage is that costs and investments can be saved, but the disadvantage is that the raw material has a low density and is expensive to transport and store. Typical raw material can be miscanthus, switch grass and other similar crops.

Shredder

Baled or loose raw material needs to be shredded first down to 80-100 mm length. The bales are placed on a conveyor, which moves the bales forward. Strings have to be removed prior to shredding. After shredding the raw material will go through a hammer mill to be downsized to 15-20 mm length.

Stone and sand removal

Agri raw materials are collected in the field and often contain stones and other larger items. These needs to be removed as they are damaging to the hammer mill and briquetting press. Stones are removed after the shredder. It is also important to separate sand from the material through a sieve prior to briquetting. Too high amount of sand will be costly on wear parts on the briquetting press.

Filtering

After the hammer mill, the raw material is sucked through a piping system through a cyclone and a filter to extract the dust and separate the air. The raw material is passed through an air-lock to a conveyor that leads it to a silo system or similar. The dust from the filter is most often lead back into the raw material, but for bedding the dust is separated.

Silo

Prior to briquetting the raw material it is lead into a silo. It is important for the efficiency of the briquetting press that the silo is full enough to give a constant feed to the briquetting press. A normal dosing silo is 4 to 8 m3, but larger silos > 50 m3 will improve efficiency of the system, as the briquetting press will be able to operate even though other parts of the line are temporary down.

Briquetting

The briquetting press is the heart of the operation. The press needs a constant feed. The presses have many features, which can be studied elsewhere on this size. The briquettes will exit in a cooling line, which will cool and harden the briquettes. For industrial fuel the cooling line needs to be approx. 15 m long and for consumer briquettes/logs approx. 30m.

Agri briquettes

Agri briquettes can be made in different diameters ranging from 50 mm to 120 mm. Most used type is 90 mm. Briquettes can be made as pucks (length 15-20 mm) or industrial briquettes (length 50-75 mm). Agri briquettes are used mostly for fuel in industrial boilers for heat, steam or electricity production, however, there they are also used for special applications as bedding and for biogas.

Biogas Briquetting Line

DRY RAW MATERIAL

Agri raw material

Agri raw material are most often baled in the field and then stored in barns or outside covered or not covered. Raw materials like wheat straw, corn stalks, cotton stalks are normally dry (below 15% moisture) or can be dried in the field. Other raw material will need to be dried prior to briquetting.

Shredder

Baled or loose raw material needs to be shredded first down to 80-100 mm length. The bales are placed on a conveyor, which moves the bales forward. Strings have to be removed prior to shredding. After shredding the raw material will go through a hammer mill to be downsized to 15-20 mm length.

Stone and sand removal

Agri raw materials are collected in the field and often contain stones and other larger items. These needs to be removed as they are damaging to the hammer mill and briquetting press. Stones are removed after the shredder. It is also important to separate sand from the material through a sieve prior to briquetting. Too high amount of sand will be costly on wear parts on the briquetting press.

Filtering

After the hammer mill, the raw material is sucked through a piping system through a cyclone and a filter to extract the dust and separate the air. The raw material is passed through an air-lock to a conveyor that leads it to a silo system or similar. The dust from the filter is most often lead back into the raw material, but for bedding the dust is separated.

Silo

Prior to briquetting the raw material it is lead into a silo. It is important for the efficiency of the briquetting press that the silo is full enough to give a constant feed to the briquetting press. A normal dosing silo is 4 to 8 m3, but larger silos > 50 m3 will improve efficiency of the system, as the briquetting press will be able to operate even though other parts of the line are temporary down.

Briquetting

The briquetting press is the heart of the operation. The press needs a constant feed. The presses have many features, which can be studied elsewhere on this size. The briquettes will exit in a cooling line, which will cool and harden the briquettes. For industrial fuel the cooling line needs to be approx. 15 m long and for consumer briquettes/logs approx. 30m.

Agri briquettes

Agri briquettes can be made in different diameters ranging from 50 mm to 120 mm. Most used type is 90 mm. Briquettes can be made as pucks (length 15-20 mm) or industrial briquettes (length 50-75 mm). Agri briquettes are used mostly for fuel in industrial boilers for heat, steam or electricity production, however, there they are also used for special applications as bedding and for biogas.

Straw briquettes feed

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Biogas digester

Agri briquettes for biogas can be fed into the digester with a chain conveyor to the top of the digester, where it will enter the digester with a screw conveyor under the surface in the digester. Alternatively, the agri briquettes are mixed with slurry in a mixer and pumped into the digester.

Energy crop

DRY RAW MATERIAL

Raw material growing

The alternative to use baled raw material is to use the raw material directly from the field. This requires the raw material to be dry (below 15% moisture). The advantage is that costs and investments can be saved, but the disadvantage is that the raw material has a low density and is expensive to transport and store. Typical raw material can be miscanthus, switch grass and other similar crops.

Stone and sand removal

Agri raw materials are collected in the field and often contain stones and other larger items. These needs to be removed as they are damaging to the hammer mill and briquetting press. Stones are removed after the shredder. It is also important to separate sand from the material through a sieve prior to briquetting. Too high amount of sand will be costly on wear parts on the briquetting press.

Silo

Prior to briquetting the raw material it is lead into a silo. It is important for the efficiency of the briquetting press that the silo is full enough to give a constant feed to the briquetting press. A normal dosing silo is 4 to 8 m3, but larger silos > 50 m3 will improve efficiency of the system, as the briquetting press will be able to operate even though other parts of the line are temporary down.

Briquetting

The briquetting press is the heart of the operation. The press needs a constant feed. The presses have many features, which can be studied elsewhere on this size. The briquettes will exit in a cooling line, which will cool and harden the briquettes. For industrial fuel the cooling line needs to be approx. 15 m long and for consumer briquettes/logs approx. 30m.

Agri briquettes

Agri briquettes can be made in different diameters ranging from 50 mm to 120 mm. Most used type is 90 mm. Briquettes can be made as pucks (length 15-20 mm) or industrial briquettes (length 50-75 mm). Agri briquettes are used mostly for fuel in industrial boilers for heat, steam or electricity production, however, there they are also used for special applications as bedding and for biogas.

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